Highlights from our Recent Cyberflaneurs

Here are ten pieces picked by Dani Rodrik, Alondra Nelson, Hari Kunzru, and Joan Subirats.

For more Cyberflâneur material.


Superstar Cities and Left-Behind Places [open access]

a document selected by Dani Rodrik

Regional inequality increased in the U.S. until the Second World War, and then began to come down — a process that ended around 1980, Since the, income inequality across space has increased yet again, with the rise of super-cities that attract talent and the most productive firms, and pay high wages. This important study provides a general theory of these swings, focusing on the rise of new technologies and how they become easier to diffuse across space over time.

Superstar Cities and Left-Behind Places

The Global Financial Resource Curse [open access]

an article chosen by Dani Rodrik

Access to financial capital flows from abroad is a good thing, right? Actually no. As this study argues, capital inflows from the rest of the world into the US economy may be one reason why manufacturing lagged in the U.S. and low-productivity services expanded.

The Global Financial Resource Curse

The Chronopolitics of Racial Time

a document picked by Alondra Nelson

A thought-provoking exploration of “the social life of time” and its implications for social inequality. Racial equality will require a resetting of political temporality, Mills suggests, more specifically, a politics of time that begins prior to domination and propels a future forward out of this reimagined past.

The Chronopolitics of Racial Time

Genetic Ancestry Testing among White Nationalists [open access]

an article marked by Alondra Nelson

A powerful example of how “genealogical aspirations”—in this case, white nationalist desires for certain racial identity—shape the interpretation of genetic ancestry testing results. Consumers generate explanations that variously reject, negotiate, and reinterpret genetic ancestry inferences to suit white supremacist ideology.

Genetic Ancestry Testing among White Nationalists

Racial Categories in Machine Learning [open access]

a document selected by Alondra Nelson

Biased or unfair AI result in part from the use of simplistic nominal categories (e.g., “Black”, “woman,” etc.) as proxies for complex phenomena like social roles or structural inequality. Grounded in “racial formation” theory, this creative paper proposes a sociotechnical methodology to identify bias upstream in the machine learning process, identifying known (and unexpected) data segregation, and initiating an iterative process that might produce a more comprehensive and fairer AI output.

Racial Categories in Machine Learning

Art After Money, Money After Art [open access]

a video marked by Hari Kunzru

Financialization transforms us all into an agent of its reproduction – we all imagine ourselves as entrepreneurs. Everything – our friendships, our community. Our sense of self is material for this process. A survey of art that takes on the financialization of art.

Art After Money, Money After Art

Wages Against Artwork [open access]

a podcast chosen by Hari Kunzru

Artists and others are often expected to be in formal ‘work-like’ situations without being remunerated. During the pandemic, much of our wage labor has been paused. ‘What we do when we live in a world that is structured and governed by the expectation of a wage, by the laws of a wage, but at certain moments we’re not being waged?

Art After Money, Money After Art

Neoliberalism as Religion

an article marked by Hari Kunzru

Neoliberalism displaces and redraws the boundary between secular and religious and appropriates an aura of sacredness while concealing itself behind an authoritative secular rational façade.

Neoliberalism as Religion

The Everyday Politics of Urban Transformational Adaptation

a document picked by Joan Subirats

As the vulnerability of cities to the effects of climate change and now with the Covid-19 crisis increases, so does the urgency of and interest in urban transformational adaptation. The question is how “everyday” urban politics shape the multi-scalar political constraints that prevent municipalities from implementing transformational adaptation.

The Everyday Politics of Urban Transformational Adaptation

New Angles on Inequality [open access]

an article selected by Joan Subirats

A volume devoted to pose two critical questions with respect to inequality: the eruption of far-right politics and the geographic separation between haves and have-nots.

New Angles on Inequality
Scroll to Top