The Cyberflâneur #37: Raul Pacheco-Vega

Raul Pacheco-Vega is a Professor in the Methods Lab of the Latin American Faculty for Social Sciences (Facultad Latinoamericana de Ciencias Sociales, FLACSO) Sede Mexico. A political scientist and geographer, Raul specialises in comparative public policy with a focus on North American environmental politics – including sanitation and water governance -, transnational social movements and experimental methods in public policy. He is also the founder of #ScholarSunday, an initiative to build an academic community online.

Raul has furnished us with a selection of ten superb pieces from our archives. You’ll learn more about water insecurity, the invisibility of homeless people in public space, the political economy of plastics and the rule of law as legal despotism.

Raul’s bio, Twitter, and see below for more of his work.

~ Evgeny Morozov

I love The Syllabus! Both the exercise of curating a selection AND reading others’ curated materials is extraordinarily enlightening!

– Raul Pacheco-Vega
An interview with Raul (in Spanish) on ethnography in the era of Covid-19.

Raul’s Selections

I.

Embodied Intersectionalities of Urban Citizenship: Water, Infrastructure, and Gender in the Global South [$]

Farhana Sultana manages to analyse in an intersectional manner many of the challenges facing urban water governance. This is a really spectacularly well done piece on water insecurity. Sultana’s work on intersectional lenses and water governance is simply superb.


II.

Reclaiming “Good Motherhood”: US Mothers’ Critical Resistance in Family Homeless Shelters [$]

This article really opened my eyes to understanding homelessness issues through a gender lens.


III.

Water Insecurity: an Agenda for Research and Call to Action for Human Biology

Everything Amber Wutich writes is extraordinary. She really has further our understanding of water insecurity at a global scale across disciplines. Her understanding of household water insecurity is unparallelled.


IV.

Neo-Extractivism, the Bolivian State, and Indigenous Peasant Women’s Struggles for Water in the Altiplano [$]

We tend to hear or read a lot about neo-extractivism and Indigenous peoples, but this article really seems to zero in on its particularities in Bolivia. How Indigenous people resist extractive industries is definitely dependent on the country under study, so I was really keen to read this article to understand Bolivian water much more in depth.


V.

Bicycle use and Accessibility among People Experiencing Homelessness in California Cities [$]

Homelessness is an area of research that is relatively new to me. I have seen individuals facing homelessness using bicycles but I had never considered the issue of accessibility and how denying this access is also impinging on homeless individuals’ human rights.


VI.

Homeless Policy as a Policy for Controlling Poverty in Tokyo: Considering the Relationship between Welfare Measures and Punitive Measures [$]

Homelessness policy is challenging and complex, and this article manages to switch the focus from housing to poverty alleviation.


VII.

The Political Economy of Plastic: a Canadian Perspective

Plastics seem to be such a developing country perspective that I was really surprised and excited to read this Canadian perspective on plastics and pollution.


VIII.

‘God Was a Rotten Plumber’: Common Sense, Moral Economy and ‘Financing Water for All’ [$]

Financing water access is always a challenge and I want to see which kinds of options are available for improved implementation of the human right to water.


IX.

The Rule of Law as Legal Despotism: Concerned Remarks on the Use of “Rule of Law” in Illiberal Democracies

Never considered “legal despotism” as being part of enforcement and rule of law!


X.

Homeless People in Public Space and the Politics of (In)visibility

Definitely a fantastic read on how we don’t develop policies for homeless individuals simply because they are invisible to us.


More by Raul Pacheco-Vega – from our Stacks

Our archive of high-quality content across text, video and audio – our “Living Syllabus” – has already reached over 25,000 items and grows larger every week.

Here are some recent pieces by or featuring Raul from those archives:

Other Cyberflâneurs

We’ve featured many fantastic individuals in this series: artists, musicians, academics, writers, journalists, politicians, and more. For the full list and to browse their selections.

A handful of our contributors so far:

 

  • Kaiser Kuo – Writer, Musician, Podcaster
  • Li Andersson – Finland’s Minister of Education and the Chairperson of the Left Alliance party
  • Ivan Krastev – Chairman of the Centre for Liberal Strategies in Sofia, Fellow at the Institute of Human Sciences in Vienna
  • Fabrizio Barca – Italian Politician, founder of Forum on Inequality and Diversity

More About our Cyberflâneur Series

To learn more about how this particularly eclectic edition of our syllabi works. Note that if you subscribe to any of our weekly syllabi, we’ll keep you posted on our latest cyberflâneurs too. Our subscribers also get a monthly Highlights From the Cyberflâneur edition.

If you’d like to propose a candidate for this series, please use this simple form.

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